10 thoughts on “Page 253

    1. Observer

      Stephen doesn’t just make this stuff up, you know. Put the coordinates of North Portal (48.9981034,-102.5508427) into Openstreetmap then wander along the border east or west. Those peach smudges are coal mines. Also visible on Google Maps ‘satellite’ view, but not labelled.

      No the really hard bit to accept is that there would still be a market for coal even in the ’40s, let alone at the time of the story. I guess with the polar ice-cap gone, the Atlantic Conveyor (aka Gulf Stream) has gone too, so Northern Europe gets to ‘enjoy’ the same climate as Newfoundland and Nova Scotia have today. Lots of “unwinterised” houses need lots of energy so populist governments will go for “burn baby burn” and too bad that the planet is uninhabitable between 30°N and 30°S.

      Reply
      1. steven Post author

        yes this could definitely be one scenario.
        Also, automation and new tech could make the process cheaper.

        Reply
      2. Ronald

        Stephen may not be making things up, but the date line does not run between Big en Little Diamede (page 245) either…

        Reply
        1. Observer

          The Seattle Times disagrees with you and does agree with Steven (first response for Google search for
          international date line Alaska Russia
          “The international dateline also marks the border between Russia and the United States off Alaska’s west coast. The islands of Big Diomede in Russia and Little Diomede in the United States are separated by 2.4 miles (3.8 kilometers) of water, with the international date line running midway between them”

          Reply
  1. Jonson26

    I checked, and the duct tape appears on page 131. Page 130 has an image of a dude with a sock in his mouth instead.

    Reply

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